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Do Your Homework Before Sending That Email1


I saw this tweet today from our friend Arianna and I had a good chuckle: Love when people cold email me with a pitch and ask to set up a call with management. Hi, that’s me! ????????‍♀️ — Arianna Simpson (@AriannaSimpson) June 12, 2018 But the underlying issue is not that funny. Someone took the time to send her a pitch email but did not take the time to figure out who she was. I’m always looking for an excuse to delete a cold email instead of replying to it. When someone sends me an email seeking to get consideration from Flatiron Partners, a firm that hasn’t been actively investing in eighteen years, I delete it. And I get those emails multiple times a month. When someone sends me an email seeking an investment in something USV does not invest in; restaurants, movies, oil drilling, etc, I delete it. And I get those emails multiple times a day. When someone sends me an email saying that they would like to come visit me in our office in San Francisco, I delete it. And I get those emails multiple times a week. On the other hand, when I get a cold email from someone who has clearly taken the time to do their homework on me and USV, I try to answer it right away. I am not perfect in replying to every email I should reply to, but I do try and I do a decent job at it. Some people figure that emails and pitches are a numbers game. In some sense they are right. But you can massively increase the hit rate if you do some prep work. And, in this day and age, it is not that hard. https://avc.com/2018/06/do-your-homework-before-sending-that-email/

Do Your Homework Before Sending That Email1


I saw this tweet today from our friend Arianna and I had a good chuckle: Love when people cold email me with a pitch and ask to set up a call with management. Hi, that’s me! ????????‍♀️ — Arianna Simpson (@AriannaSimpson) June 12, 2018 But the underlying issue is not that funny. Someone took the time to send her a pitch email but did not take the time to figure out who she was. I’m always looking for an excuse to delete a cold email instead of replying to it. When someone sends me an email seeking to get consideration from Flatiron Partners, a firm that hasn’t been actively investing in eighteen years, I delete it. And I get those emails multiple times a month. When someone sends me an email seeking an investment in something USV does not invest in; restaurants, movies, oil drilling, etc, I delete it. And I get those emails multiple times a day. When someone sends me an email saying that they would like to come visit me in our office in San Francisco, I delete it. And I get those emails multiple times a week. On the other hand, when I get a cold email from someone who has clearly taken the time to do their homework on me and USV, I try to answer it right away. I am not perfect in replying to every email I should reply to, but I do try and I do a decent job at it. Some people figure that emails and pitches are a numbers game. In some sense they are right. But you can massively increase the hit rate if you do some prep work. And, in this day and age, it is not that hard. https://avc.com/2018/06/do-your-homework-before-sending-that-email/

Reading – You Are What You Read


Source: http://themusingsofthebigredcar.com/reading-you-are-what-you-read/ Reading, Big Red Car? Big Red Car here on a coolish, slightly sunny morning in the ATX. The sun is late on station this morning. I have been reading the Ron Chernow book on Grant. This book is 1,000 pages and has small print. I am halfway through. It is a little dog eared from trips to Savannah, Miramar Beach, Phoenix, Charlotte. Until finished, it is my constant travel companion. I try to read 15-60 minutes every night. I WILL finish this book this month. Reading, why, Big Red Car? It is simple, dear reader. What we read, provokes our thinking. What we think enriches our speech. What we speak of, we explore and do. What we do sets our character. And, dear reader, our character informs, marks, guides our lives. So, pick what you read carefully. Let it inspire you. Ron Chernow While on the subject of Ron Chernow, let me recommend two other great books: The Chernow book on Washington is one of the best reads I have ever had on the First President of the United States. I was surprised to learn what a great entrepreneur George Washington was before he emerged on the stage of history as the Commander-in-Chief of the Colonial army. [Make a commitment. It is about 1,000 pages and has the same small print.] The Chernow book on Hamilton is an extraordinary read. I knew a lot about Washington, but next to nothing about Hamilton – the builder of many of America’s governmental institutions such as the State Department and the Coast Guard. This is the book which inspired the play Hamilton. It is a great read. Another 1,000 pages of small print filled to overflowing with history, vital American history. So, there you have it, dear reader. Reading! But, hey, what the Hell do I really know anyway? I’m just a Big Red Car. Be good to yourself. Say a quick prayer for world peace and the Trump-Kim summit.  Share this:TweetShare on TumblrPrint Related Source: http://themusingsofthebigredcar.com/reading-you-are-what-you-read/

Stakeholder Analysis


I am a fan of looking at something from all sides and understanding how each side thinks about it. Consider a neighborhood school. There are students, parents, teachers, administrators, non-teaching staff, taxpayers, the community, homeowners (whose home value is impacted by the quality of the school), and possibly other stakeholders. In theory every one of those stakeholders has a vested interest in the success of the school but in reality there is often conflict between them. The teachers would certainly welcome a pay raise, for example. But the taxpayers may not. Or maybe they would because it would keep the quality high and thus the values of their homes. What if the school wanted to start later and end later? The parents might oppose it because it would make it harder for them to get to work on time in the morning. But the teachers, administrators, and non teaching staff might welcome it because they would find it easier to get to work on time in the mornings. All complex systems have many stakeholders and while they all want the system to succeed, because they have a stake in it, they rarely view success in the same terms. Stakeholder analysis is extremely helpful in running a company and governing it (the work of the Board). And the stakeholders of a company are not just the stockholders. Even when a Board and management is tasked with acting in the best interests of the stockholders, it is wise and prudent to act in the best interests of all of the stakeholders. Doing so, however, is often impossible because of these conflicts between stakeholders. Done properly, a stakeholder analysis attempts to determine what each and every stakeholder desires and the impact to them of an important decision. It is like a scorecard. It is often helpful to look at short term, medium term, and long term impacts. I find that it is often the case that conflicts are the most extreme in the short term and that if you can frame a decision and the impact of it over a very long time horizon, it can be easier to get alignment. But regardless of whether you can get alignment, a CEO must act and act decisively. And a Board must make sure that the CEO is acting wisely and in the best interests of the stockholders and stakeholders. So doing a stakeholder analysis, understanding where the issues are and will be, and making a fully informed decision is the best course of action. And you will want a communication plan to mitigate the fallout of the decision as much as possible. You never want to surprise or be surprised by your stakeholders. They may not like you, agree with you, or even support you. But they must be understood, respected, and considered in your decision making process. https://avc.com/2018/06/stakeholder-analysis/

Stakeholder Analysis1


I am a fan of looking at something from all sides and understanding how each side thinks about it. Consider a neighborhood school. There are students, parents, teachers, administrators, non-teaching staff, taxpayers, the community, homeowners (whose home value is impacted by the quality of the school), and possibly other stakeholders. In theory every one of those stakeholders has a vested interest in the success of the school but in reality there is often conflict between them. The teachers would certainly welcome a pay raise, for example. But the taxpayers may not. Or maybe they would because it would keep the quality high and thus the values of their homes. What if the school wanted to start later and end later? The parents might oppose it because it would make it harder for them to get to work on time in the morning. But the teachers, administrators, and non teaching staff might welcome it because they would find it easier to get to work on time in the mornings. All complex systems have many stakeholders and while they all want the system to succeed, because they have a stake in it, they rarely view success in the same terms. Stakeholder analysis is extremely helpful in running a company and governing it (the work of the Board). And the stakeholders of a company are not just the stockholders. Even when a Board and management is tasked with acting in the best interests of the stockholders, it is wise and prudent to act in the best interests of all of the stakeholders. Doing so, however, is often impossible because of these conflicts between stakeholders. Done properly, a stakeholder analysis attempts to determine what each and every stakeholder desires and the impact to them of an important decision. It is like a scorecard. It is often helpful to look at short term, medium term, and long term impacts. I find that it is often the case that conflicts are the most extreme in the short term and that if you can frame a decision and the impact of it over a very long time horizon, it can be easier to get alignment. But regardless of whether you can get alignment, a CEO must act and act decisively. And a Board must make sure that the CEO is acting wisely and in the best interests of the stockholders and stakeholders. So doing a stakeholder analysis, understanding where the issues are and will be, and making a fully informed decision is the best course of action. And you will want a communication plan to mitigate the fallout of the decision as much as possible. You never want to surprise or be surprised by your stakeholders. They may not like you, agree with you, or even support you. But they must be understood, respected, and considered in your decision making process. https://avc.com/2018/06/stakeholder-analysis/