SIGN IN

Forgot Your Password?


Incorrect login or password

SIGN UP



Existing user?

Centralization vs Decentralization1


Decentralization is one of, if not the most, discussed features of the crypto tech stack. In a decentralized system, no single body controls the system. We have most certainly not reached the era fully decentralized systems, but that is what most of the world-class technologists working in the crypto sector are focused on getting us to and I believe we will get there in the not too distant future. If you are a student of tech history, you will not be surprised that decentralization is also the right technology arriving at the right time to solve some of the most challenging policy problems facing the tech sector right now. Before I elaborate on that, I want to show you a slide from my colleague Nick‘s deck on crypto that he uses to talk to policymakers and elected officials. I believe he borrowed it from our friends at Placeholder and they are credited at the bottom of this slide. Here is my quick explanation of that slide. IBM had a near monopoly on computing by virtue of their domination of the mainframe, mini-computer, and, it seemed, the PC computing platforms. But the open PC hardware standard allowed Microsoft to develop an operating system that could run on any computer built to the PC hardware spec and they eventually unseated IBM, only to become a near monopoly themselves. But just as we were wringing our hands about what to do about Microsoft’s monopoly, an open source operating system (Linux), the internet protocols, and the free distribution of the world wide web undid that monopoly and we got Google, Facebook, Amazon, and other big tech platforms. And now we are wringing our hands about these near monopolies and their market power and the ability of bad actors to manipulate them. And around the same time, the technology to architect and scale a completely decentralized system emerges. The other thing that is true of these moments of hand wringing is that just as the technology is emerging to unseat the near monopolies, regulators and elected officials try to put the genie back in the bottle using traditional regulatory techniques that often end up more deeply entrenching these near monopolies. To give you an example of how this might happen, I am going to suggest you all go read my partner Albert’s post from yesterday on Twitter and how one might approach addressing some of the vexing problems that platform is dealing with right now. Albert points out that: On the minus side the calls to treat Twitter as a traditional publisher are growing. That is how elected officials and regulators often think. They look backwards to find a model of regulation that has worked in the past and try to apply it to a new thing. But as Albert explains: The idea that there could or should be a single central institution, let alone a commercial company, which as a benevolent dictator resolves all of these issues to everyone’s satisfaction is a complete non-starter. Instead he proposes a few ideas that are steeped in decentralization: my preferred go to answer is to shift more power to the network participants by requiring Twitter (and other scaled services) to have an API. That would allow endusers to programmatically create the best version of Twitter and would also make it easier to simultaneously use Twitter and new decentralized alternatives. And Twitter should significantly expand the features that let individuals and groups manage the visibility for tweets for themselves. There are already useful features such as muting a conversation or blocking an individual. These could be expanded in ways that allow for delegation. For instance, users should be able to say that they want to subscribe to mute and block lists from other individuals, groups or organizations they trust. One example of this might be that I could choose to automatically block anyone who is blocked by more than x% of the people I follow (where I can choose x). Ideally these features could be implemented at the tweet/conversation level and not just the account level. So you can see that by decentralizing the power to the edges of the network INSTEAD of further concentrating it by requiring the network owner to further centralize power is the right answer, both from a technology perspective and a regulatory/policy perspective. Sadly, I think we are in a race with ourselves in this centralization vs decentralization debate. We need the decentralized tech stack to evolve more quickly and show the world how decentralized technology works in a mainstream way at scale before policy makers and regulators force the tech sector to go the wrong way. And, most disturbingly, the regulators and elected officials are taking actions, well intended of course, to slow the decentralized sector down, not speed it up. Which is why we at USV have been spending a lot of time with public servants of all kinds, educating them, imploring them, and desperately trying to get them to understand where we are, why it is an important moment, and why we need to this new technology to succeed. https://avc.com/2018/12/centralization-vs-decentralization/

Centralization vs Decentralization


Decentralization is one of, if not the most, discussed features of the crypto tech stack. In a decentralized system, no single body controls the system. We have most certainly not reached the era fully decentralized systems, but that is what most of the world-class technologists working in the crypto sector are focused on getting us to and I believe we will get there in the not too distant future. If you are a student of tech history, you will not be surprised that decentralization is also the right technology arriving at the right time to solve some of the most challenging policy problems facing the tech sector right now. Before I elaborate on that, I want to show you a slide from my colleague Nick‘s deck on crypto that he uses to talk to policymakers and elected officials. I believe he borrowed it from our friends at Placeholder and they are credited at the bottom of this slide. Here is my quick explanation of that slide. IBM had a near monopoly on computing by virtue of their domination of the mainframe, mini-computer, and, it seemed, the PC computing platforms. But the open PC hardware standard allowed Microsoft to develop an operating system that could run on any computer built to the PC hardware spec and they eventually unseated IBM, only to become a near monopoly themselves. But just as we were wringing our hands about what to do about Microsoft’s monopoly, an open source operating system (Linux), the internet protocols, and the free distribution of the world wide web undid that monopoly and we got Google, Facebook, Amazon, and other big tech platforms. And now we are wringing our hands about these near monopolies and their market power and the ability of bad actors to manipulate them. And around the same time, the technology to architect and scale a completely decentralized system emerges. The other thing that is true of these moments of hand wringing is that just as the technology is emerging to unseat the near monopolies, regulators and elected officials try to put the genie back in the bottle using traditional regulatory techniques that often end up more deeply entrenching these near monopolies. To give you an example of how this might happen, I am going to suggest you all go read my partner Albert’s post from yesterday on Twitter and how one might approach addressing some of the vexing problems that platform is dealing with right now. Albert points out that: On the minus side the calls to treat Twitter as a traditional publisher are growing. That is how elected officials and regulators often think. They look backwards to find a model of regulation that has worked in the past and try to apply it to a new thing. But as Albert explains: The idea that there could or should be a single central institution, let alone a commercial company, which as a benevolent dictator resolves all of these issues to everyone’s satisfaction is a complete non-starter. Instead he proposes a few ideas that are steeped in decentralization: my preferred go to answer is to shift more power to the network participants by requiring Twitter (and other scaled services) to have an API. That would allow endusers to programmatically create the best version of Twitter and would also make it easier to simultaneously use Twitter and new decentralized alternatives. And Twitter should significantly expand the features that let individuals and groups manage the visibility for tweets for themselves. There are already useful features such as muting a conversation or blocking an individual. These could be expanded in ways that allow for delegation. For instance, users should be able to say that they want to subscribe to mute and block lists from other individuals, groups or organizations they trust. One example of this might be that I could choose to automatically block anyone who is blocked by more than x% of the people I follow (where I can choose x). Ideally these features could be implemented at the tweet/conversation level and not just the account level. So you can see that by decentralizing the power to the edges of the network INSTEAD of further concentrating it by requiring the network owner to further centralize power is the right answer, both from a technology perspective and a regulatory/policy perspective. Sadly, I think we are in a race with ourselves in this centralization vs decentralization debate. We need the decentralized tech stack to evolve more quickly and show the world how decentralized technology works in a mainstream way at scale before policy makers and regulators force the tech sector to go the wrong way. And, most disturbingly, the regulators and elected officials are taking actions, well intended of course, to slow the decentralized sector down, not speed it up. Which is why we at USV have been spending a lot of time with public servants of all kinds, educating them, imploring them, and desperately trying to get them to understand where we are, why it is an important moment, and why we need to this new technology to succeed. https://avc.com/2018/12/centralization-vs-decentralization/

Todavía hay familias que están siendo separadas en la frontera, meses después de haberse revocado la “cero tolerancia”


The Trump Administration The 45th President and His Administration Zero Tolerance Trump’s Immigration Policy at the Border Brian Stauffer, especial para ProPublica Read in English. La administración de Trump ha vuelto a separar a familias en la frontera, esta vez en forma sigilosa y justificando el acto con alegatos imprecisos y no corroborados en contra de los padres, acusándolos de ofensas o delitos menores que incluyen el cargo de reingresar al país ilegalmente. En los últimos tres meses en Nueva York, varios abogados de Caridades Católicas, organización que presta servicios legales a menores inmigrantes bajo custodia gubernamental en ese estado, descubrieron por lo menos dieciséis casos nuevos de separación. Mencionan que se fueron dando cuenta por casualidad, siguiendo sus propias pistas después de que los menores fueron colocados en casas o instituciones de tutela provisionales casi sin indicios de que habían llegado a la frontera con sus padres, o sin que se diera a conocer esa información. ProPublica se topó con uno de estos casos a fines del mes pasado, cuando recibió la llamada desesperada de un padre salvadoreño detenido en el Sur de Texas, informando que, literalmente, un agente de Aduana y Protección Fronteriza le arrancó de los brazos a su hijo Brayan de 4 años de edad cuando cruzaron la frontera y pidieron asilo. El padre, de nombre Julio, pidió que no se divulgara su apellido debido a que huye de la violencia pandillera y le inquieta la seguridad de sus familiares en su país. “Le fallé”, dijo el muchacho de 27 años, llorando desoladamente. “Todo lo que había hecho para ser un buen padre quedó destruido en un instante”. Get Our Top Investigations Subscribe to the Big Story newsletter. ProPublica localizó a Brayan, pequeño de cabello rubio rojizo y un ceceo adorable, en una agencia de tutela provisional de la ciudad de Nueva York. Luego nos comunicamos con la abogada quien lo representa. Jodi Ziesemer, Abogada Supervisora de Caridades Católicas, no tenía idea, sino hasta esa llamada, de que a Brayan lo habían separado de su padre y comentó que ese caos era inquietante por parecerse demasiado a la cero tolerancia de hace unos meses. “Es tan desalentador”, dijo Ziesemer. “Se supone que esa política ya había terminado”. Para efectos oficiales, así lo fue. El 20 de junio, el Presidente Donald Trump firmó una orden ejecutiva que retractaba la política de cero tolerancia para hacer cumplir las leyes migratorias. Bajo la política, las autoridades tuvieron órdenes de someter a proceso penal a cualquier adulto que fuera detenido por cruzar la frontera ilegalmente, además de separarlo de cualquier menor acompañante. Una semana después, la Juez Federal Dana M. Sabraw dictó un mandato en contra de las separaciones y ordenó que el gobierno reunificara a las familias afectadas. Sin embargo, la Juez Sabraw exentó a los casos en los que peligraran los menores y, algo crucial, no impuso normas ni supervisión para regir la toma de decisiones. El resultado, dicen los abogados de inmigración, fue que los funcionarios migratorios, basándose en las claves de una administración que sigue creyendo claramente en que la separación de familias es un método de disuasión eficaz, utilizan cualquier justificación a su disposición, con o sin corroborarla, para determinar que los inmigrantes son padres no aptos o peligrosos. “Si las autoridades tienen la más mínima evidencia de que uno de los padres fue miembro de una pandilla, o de que tiene cualquier tipo de mancha en sus antecedentes”, dijo Neha Desai, abogada superior del Centro Nacional del Derecho Juvenil (National Center for Youth Law); “cualquier cosa que puedan encontrar para decir que la separación es para el bien y la salud del menor, entonces los separarán”. Brayan, un niño salvadoreño de cuatro a os. (Cortes a de Mercedes Linares) En un mensaje de correo electrónico, un funcionario de la CBP reconoció que, efectivamente, siguen separando a las familias de inmigrantes, pero que dichas separaciones “no tenían nada que ver con la cero tolerancia”. El funcionario añadió que “esta administración sigue cumpliendo con la ley y separa a adultos y menores cuando sea requerido para la seguridad y protección de un menor”. El funcionario se rehusó a decir cuántos niños han sido alejados de sus padres por tales motivos, los cuales denominan como protección al menor. Los funcionarios de la CBP explicaron que el caso de Brayan es como estos. Uno de los funcionarios comentó que la agencia había revisado los antecedentes de Julio, en forma de rutina, “confirmando que era miembro de la pandilla MS-13”. La vocera Corry Schiermeyer se rehusó a proporcionar la evidencia que tiene la agencia para respaldar su alegato, diciendo únicamente que era “confidencial para fines del cumplimiento de la ley”. Tampoco quiso decir los motivos que tiene la CBP para creer que Julio representa un peligro para su hijo, aunando que la orden de la Jueza Sabraw “no impedía estas separaciones, sino que, de hecho, permitía de manera explícita que el DHS continuara esa práctica anterior”. La CBP tampoco compartió evidencia alguna con Georgia Evangelista, abogada de Julio, para respaldar la aseveración de que él tiene vínculos con las pandillas. Ella incluso cuestiona si realmente existe. (Evangelista también comentó que el pasado martes, uno de los fiscales del gobierno reiteró el alegato ante un juez de inmigración en el Sur de Texas, pero sin poder darle la documentación llamándola “confidencial”. La abogada dijo que el juez de migración no presionó al fiscal para que divulgara la evidencia, pero que sí había dejado a su cliente en libertad bajo una fianza de $US 8 mil dólares. Evangelista se sintió frustrada con el resultado y comentó: “¿Cómo podemos pelear los cargos sin saber qué son?”) Según ella, Julio llegó a la frontera a mediados de septiembre portando un oficio redactado por un abogado salvadoreño en el cual se explicaba que huía de El Salvador con su hijo debido a que había sido atacado y amenazado por las pandillas en su país durante años. A petición de la abogada Evangelista, el abogado salvadoreño y el ex empleador de Julio enviaron declaraciones juradas dando fe sobre su carácter y mencionando que él nunca había participado en actos delincuentes. “Esto me pone furiosa, No están jugando bajo las reglas”, comentó Evangelista refiriéndose a las autoridades migratorias estadounidenses. “Lo tratan como si fuera delincuente para poder justificar que le quitaron su hijo. ¿Dónde están las pruebas? Es su palabra contra la de ellos. Realmente me enferma.” Susan Watson, abogada de derechos humanos y derecho familiar, dijo que en casos de tutela de menores que no incluyan temas migratorios, sería imposible llevar a cabo ese tipo de actividad sin el visto bueno de un juez. “De acuerdo con la Constitución, una persona tiene derecho al proceso legal debido antes de que se le separe de un hijo”, comentó. “En algún lugar recóndito de la Patrulla Fronteriza existe una decisión que no cumple con esa norma”. En Nueva York, Ziesemer dice que los menores separados identificados por su organización incluyen niños y niñas de entre 2 y 17 años de edad, además de Brayan. Todos llegaron a esa ciudad sin expedientes que indicaran que fueron separados de sus padres en la frontera, ni con los motivos de la separación. Semanas atrás, la ACLU, organización que presentara la demanda relacionada con la primera ronda de familias separadas, envió un oficio al Departamento de Justicia enumerando sus inquietudes acerca de los casos nuevos, específicamente en lo tocante a la justificación de las separaciones y por qué la ACLU no había recibido conocimiento al respecto. Lee Gelernt, abogado de la ACLU encargado de la demanda en contra de la separación familiar presentada por esa organización en la primavera, mencionó que, “si el gobierno sigue separando a menores en secreto, y lo hace basándose en pretextos endebles, esa actividad sería evidentemente inconstitucional y habrá que regresar al juzgado”. Los abogados de la ACLU y Caridades Católicas dicen que el DOJ respondió diciendo que no tiene obligación de informarle a la ACLU acerca de las nuevas separaciones, en vista de que estas no se llevaron a cabo como parte de la política de cero tolerancia. El organismo dijo que en catorce de los diecisiete casos mencionados en el oficio de la ACLU, los menores fueron tomados de la custodia de sus padres debido a que las autoridades sospecharon que estos tenían algún antecedente penal que los hacía no aptos, o hasta peligrosos en ese rol. Sin embargo, el DOJ no especificó los supuestos delitos sospechados de los padres ni la evidencia que las autoridades tienen para respaldar sus alegatos. La ACLU, y otros grupos dedicados a representar a niños inmigrantes, comentaron que el secretismo del DOJ es bastante inquietante por varios motivos. Les preocupa que el Departamento de Seguridad Nacional haya permitido que funcionarios sin capacitación formal en temas de custodia de menores, principalmente agentes de la Patrulla Fronteriza, tomen decisiones basadas en normas que podrían infringir sobre el espíritu de la orden judicial, y que nunca tendrían validez para casos no migratorios. Ziesemer ha hablado con familiares y trabajadores sociales y comenta que sospecha que por lo menos ocho de esos casos son de padres cuyo delito es haber vuelto a entrar al país ilegalmente. El reingreso ilegal al país es un delito mayor, aunque no era típico en esos casos que las administraciones previas separaran a las familias. Ziesemer dijo que los alegatos presentados por el gobierno para justificar las separaciones en ocho casos adicionales fueron, o imprecisas, o no corroboradas. El último caso que ella detectó se trata de un padre que fue hospitalizado. “La postura del gobierno es que, debido a que estos casos no son parte de la cero tolerancia, no es necesario informarnos al respecto. Ni a nosotros, ni a nadie más” dijo Ziesemer. “Por nuestra parte, nosotros sostenemos que debe haber cierta supervisión cuando se trata de menores que son alejados de sus padres”. El caso de Brayan es un ejemplo vívido de cómo las autoridades interpretan la orden judicial para permitir la separación de una familia. Yo me enteré de él por accidente. A principios del mes pasado, después de publicarse el informe gubernamental en el cual se indicó que más de 2,600 niños inmigrantes fueron separados de sus familias bajo la política de cero tolerancia, ya sólo tenían bajo su cuidado un menor de 5 años. Decidí encontrarlo pensando que su caso sería un punto final cautivador del reportaje que publiqué este año acerca de Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid, la niña cuyos llantos fueron grabados en las instalaciones de la Patrulla Fronteriza en junio. Esa grabación inició la tormenta de rabia que inclinó la balanza en contra de la política de separación de familias impuesta por la administración de Trump. Leer Más Un encausado se presenta solo al tribunal de inmigración. Tiene 6 años de edad. Wilder Hilario Maldonado Cabrera fue el compareciente más joven de la lista de casos juveniles de ese día; también era uno de los últimos menores que aún seguía bajo custodia del gobierno en virtud de haber sido afectado por la política de cero tolerancia. Thelma O.García, abogada en la frontera, dijo que ella había representado a Wilder Hilario Maldonado Cabrera, niño salvadoreño de seis años colocado en un hogar de tutela provisional en San Antonio. Wilder fue separado de su padre en junio, mencionó la abogada, y no lo habían reunido con él debido a que el padre tenía una orden de arresto de hacía diez años por manejar en estado de ebriedad en el estado de Florida. Ese padre, Hilario Maldonado, se comunicó conmigo desde el reclusorio de Pearsall en el Sur de Texas. En la llamada me comentó que había tratado de mantenerse en contacto con Wilder por teléfono, pero que la trabajadora social encargada no siempre contestaba la llamada. Cuando lograba conectarse, dijo que Wilder, niño gordito, chimuelo y precoz, lo regañaba por no ir por él para regresarlo a casa. Yo le comenté al Sr. Maldonado que quizás él sería uno de los últimos padres que viviría esa separación, debido a que el gobierno había aceptado cesarlas. El Sr. Maldonado (de 39 años), respondió que eso no era cierto y que las separaciones continuaban porque él sabía de un caso. Minutos después recibí la llamada de Julio, también detenido en el mismo centro. Escuché su voz desesperada, llena de llanto y súplicas para obtener respuestas cuando me contó que se había entregado junto con Brayan ante las autoridades justo al cruzar la frontera para pedir asilo. También dijo que había informado a los agentes migratorios que su madre, quien vive en Austin, Texas, estaba dispuesta a ayudarlo a ubicarse. Siete días después, un agente de la Patrulla Fronteriza se llevó gritando a Brayan, quien llevaba puesta una camiseta de SpongeBob Square Pants. Julio dijo que lo único que sabía era que su hijo se encontraba en algún lugar de Nueva York. En cuanto colgamos llamé a la abogada Ziesemer de Caridades Católicas, organización contratada por el gobierno para dispensar servicios legales a menores no acompañados en esa ciudad. Le pregunté si se había enterado acerca de Brayan. “Sí, conocemos a ese chico”, respondió Ziesemer rápidamente, “pero no sabíamos que había sido separado de su padre”. La escuché obviamente sorprendida. “Hasta su llamada, lo único que tenía era su nombre en una lista”, comentó. Inmediatamente, Ziesemer tramitó que Brayan fuera llevado a su oficina ya que el niño se encontraba en un hogar de tutela provisional. Por su experiencia, no anticipó mucho de esa primera visita. Era probable que Brayan tuviera miedo aparte de ser un chico de sólo 4 años. Para que se sintiera cómodo, le ofreció una caja de crayones y un libro para dibujar del Hombre Araña. El pequeño se conectó con ella rápidamente, mostrándole sus dibujos, imitando los movimientos del personaje de las caricaturas, y enseñándole sus garabatos cuando ella le pidió que escribiera su nombre en una hoja de papel. Sin embargo, y corroborando lo que ella esperaba, el niño era demasiado pequeño para darle sentido a lo que había sucedido en la frontera, y menos para explicárselo a una persona adulta que acababa de conocer. Su ceceo también hizo difícil que Ziesemer entendiera lo poco que podía contarle. Luego de la visita, la abogada comentó lo exasperante que era tener que interrogar a un niño, mencionando también el terror de pensar en que podría haber otros menores como él hundidos en las listas. “Nosotros, junto con los trabajadores sociales y los consulados, hacemos todo lo posible para llenar las brechas y determinar de dónde provienen estos niños”, dijo. “Pero eso significa que transcurren días y semanas sin que muchos de ellos sepan el paradero de sus padres; y vice versa. Y, no es necesario que sea así, no debería ser así”. Yo me trasladé a Pearsall para conocer a Julio después de la reunión entre Ziesemer y Brayan. Él me contó que había huido de su país con su hijo porque las pandillas callejeras lo amenazaban con matarlo cuando se enteraron de que había denunciado a uno de sus miembros ante la policía. Su esposa e hijastro permanecieron allá porque no tuvieron suficiente dinero para venirse juntos. También hablé con su esposa, y ella me informó que estaba escondida en casa de sus padres debido a que no quería que los pandilleros la encontraran en la suya si llegaran a buscar a su esposo. Las fotografías que envió su familia muestran a Julio con semblante de policía, fuerte y con cabello rapado. Pero, después de un mes detenido, su aspecto era más bien pálido y desanimado. Traía puesto el uniforme del centro de detención y su cabello castaño oscuro húmedo aunque bien peinado. No tiene tatuajes, cosa común en los pandilleros centroamericanos. Entre llanto, Julio me contó que repasaba mentalmente los días cuando llegó a la frontera para tratar de entender por qué las autoridades le habían quitado a su hijo. Julio y Brayan habían quedado detenidos en la ya famosa “heladera”, las instalaciones de detención con aire acondicionado que fuera la primera parada para la mayoría de los inmigrantes interceptados en la frontera. Brayan comenzó a tener una fiebre alta y tuvieron que llevarlo al hospital para atenderlo. El agente de la Patrulla Fronteriza quien los llevó regañó a Julio por traer a un niño tan pequeño en un viaje tan horroroso. ¿Sería por eso que le quitaron a su hijo? ¿Fue porque los agentes vieron el color del cabello de Brayan y no creyeron que él era su padre? Julio se cuestiona si lo engañaron para que firmara un documento en el hospital (ya que todos estaban en inglés) con el cual cedía sus derechos a su hijo. ¿Sería por haber sido arrestado por robo en una ocasión en El Salvador, aunque haya sido exonerado dos días después cuando las autoridades se dieron cuenta de que tenían a la persona equivocada? ¿Por qué lo consideraban peligroso para su hijo? Fue realmente de mi parte que Julio se enteró que los agentes de la Patrulla Fronteriza se llevaron a Brayan por sospechar que era pandillero. Lo revelado lo tumbó bastante. También lo confundió, ya que, al mismo tiempo en que la CBP lo consideraba pandillero, el DHS, otro organismo gubernamental, encontró que su petición de asilo, en la cual Julio declaraba haber sido víctima de violencia de pandillas, era lo suficientemente convincente para ser escuchada por un juez de inmigración. A principios de octubre Julio se había reunido con un oficial de asilo para lo se conoce como entrevista para determinar un miedo creíble. De acuerdo con el informe de la misma, proporcionado por Julio a ProPublica, el oficial de asilo no solo le preguntó por qué había huido de El Salvador, sino que también si tenía antecedentes penales. Estas son varias de las preguntas: ¿Ha cometido un delito en algún país? ¿Le ha hecho daño a una persona por cualquier motivo? Aunque no haya querido hacerlo, ¿ayudó a alguien más a hacerle daño a una o más personas? ¿Ha sido arrestado o condenado por algún delito? ¿Fue miembro de una pandilla? Julio contestó no a todas las preguntas. El oficial de asilo quien llevó a cabo la entrevista dictaminó que su información era creíble. Además, y significativamente, también indicó que no había recibido información despectiva ni expedientes penales que descalificaran a Julio automáticamente para logar el asilo automáticamente. La discrepancia refleja las diferencias entre las normas legales de asilo y de separación de familias. Mientras que la decisión del oficial de asilo queda sujeta a revisión de parte de un juez, Julio tiene una audiencia el próximo martes, la decisión de la Patrulla Fronteriza de llevarse a su hijo no tiene ese requisito. Leer Más Para una niña de seis años atrapada en el laberinto de inmigración, un número de teléfono memorizado se convierte en su salvavidas Mientras el gobierno federal intenta reunir a las familias de migrantes, los niños tendrán la dura tarea de ayudar a identificar y ubicar a sus padres. La niña de seis años a quien se escuchaba en una grabación la semana pasada como pedía llamar a su tía tiene una ventaja. Esto es lo que pasó a los 99 niños inmigrantes separados de sus padres y enviados a Chicago Documentos confidenciales revelan detalles sobre los problemas para encontrar a los padres y las experiencias traumáticas durante la política de tolerancia cero de la administración Trump. “Realmente no sé qué tipo de información tengan acerca de Julio, si es que tienen algo”, dijo la abogada Evangelista. “Cuentan con toda la discreción posible en cuanto a separarlo del menor. Pueden hacer lo que quieran y sin tener que explicar los porqués”. Julio dijo que su propio padre lo había abandonado cuando tenía más o menos la edad de Brayan. Su madre luego se fue a los Estados Unidos cuando él tenía 7 años. Comentó que él juró nunca hacerle eso a Brayan y que por eso no lo había dejado en El Salvador. Ahora se cuestiona si eso fue un error. Julio comentó que cada vez que habla con Brayan por teléfono sentía que se alejaban más. “Él me dice: ‘tú ya no eres mi papá. Yo tengo un nuevo papá’”, comenta Julio sobre su hijo, añadiendo: “Ni siquiera me dice papá, sino que papi. Yo nunca le enseñé esa palabra”. En Nueva York, la abogada Ziesemer dice que se preocupa de que la separación de familias esté comenzando nuevamente. Comentó que, al ver a Brayan en su oficina recordó las caritas de más de cuatrocientos niños separados que habían pasado por ahí durante el verano. Como punto de contacto de Caridades Católicas durante la crisis, dijo que llegó a conocer a cada uno de esos niños y niñas de nombre. Incluso una pequeña de 9 años tuvo un ataque de pánico cuando se le pidió que entrara a un cuarto con su hermana, porque pensó que Ziesemer iba a llevarse a la hermana de la misma forma en que los oficiales se llevaron a su madre. “Hubo un momento en el que tuvimos que llevar a cabo una junta con todo el personal para explicar por qué la sala de conferencias estaba repleta de niños en pleno llanto”, dijo. Caridades Católicas, la ACLU y varios otros grupos importantes de ayuda para inmigrantes, lideraron la reunificación de las familias dedicándose a llamar a padres aún detenidos en los centros de inmigración, y a despachar personal a Centroamérica para localizar a quienes ya habían sido deportados. Aparte de la “enorme y pesada tarea” de esa reunificación, dijo Ziesemer, se llevó a cabo una avalancha de llamadas y correo electrónico provenientes del Congreso y de los consulados y los medios de comunicación, todos en búsqueda de información relacionada con las separaciones. Ziesemer también comentó que ella y su equipo trabajaron mañana y noche durante meses y que, aunque todavía existen varias docenas de niños que siguen esperando reunirse con sus padres, ella había pensado que las cosas se estaban concluyendo. Fue entonces cuando comenzó a ver casos nuevos como el de Brayan, con ciertos elementos similares a los de antes. Brayan la abuela en Austin, Texas, equipada con un dormitorio en anticipación de su llegada. (Cortesía de Mercedes Linares) Ziesemer no sabía mucho acerca de Brayan aparte de la información que obtuvo de su parte al conocerlo. Fue entonces que yo compartí con ella lo que había llegado a conocer acerca de él por su familia: que se podía comer cuatro huevos cocidos de una sentada; que le encantaba Lighting McQueen, el personaje de la película de coches de Pixar; y que tenía un perrito llamado Lucky a quien insistía ver cuando hacía video llamadas con su madre por WhatsApp. Su abuela en Austin le tenía preparada una recámara llena de muñecos del Ratón Mickey, carritos de control remoto y abrigos para el inverno. Le comenté también la consternación de Julio cuando Brayan le decía “papi”. “Un par de semanas es un tiempo largo para un niño se su edad”, comentó acerca de él. “Comienzan a desapegarse de la gente, incluso hasta de sus padres”. Traducción de Mati Vargas-Gibson. Filed under: Immigration The Trump Administration

Video Of The Week: The Sorkin-Clayton Interview1


One of the big issues facing the crypto sector is the regulatory question, both in the US, where it looms largest, and elsewhere around the world. In the last few weeks we have seen the SEC reach settlements with several crypto projects and decentralized exchanges, all of which were the subject of enforcement actions or threatened enforcement actions. As I alluded to in this post last week, I fully expect to see the SEC continue to look hard at the crypto sector in an effort to rein in what it sees as violations of its rules on the offering and sale and trading of securities. In the wake of all that, The New York Times hosted an event last week in which Andrew Ross Sorkin interviewed SEC Chairman Jay Clayton.  This is a recording of that interview. The conversation is about an hour long. You can/should fast forward to 11 1/2 minutes in to bypass all the introductions. https://avc.com/2018/12/video-of-the-week-the-sorkin-clayton-interview/

Video Of The Week: The Sorkin-Clayton Interview1


One of the big issues facing the crypto sector is the regulatory question, both in the US, where it looms largest, and elsewhere around the world. In the last few weeks we have seen the SEC reach settlements with several crypto projects and decentralized exchanges, all of which were the subject of enforcement actions or threatened enforcement actions. As I alluded to in this post last week, I fully expect to see the SEC continue to look hard at the crypto sector in an effort to rein in what it sees as violations of its rules on the offering and sale and trading of securities. In the wake of all that, The New York Times hosted an event last week in which Andrew Ross Sorkin interviewed SEC Chairman Jay Clayton.  This is a recording of that interview. The conversation is about an hour long. You can/should fast forward to 11 1/2 minutes in to bypass all the introductions. https://avc.com/2018/12/video-of-the-week-the-sorkin-clayton-interview/