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Investment Risk Tolerance By Gender1


Our portfolio company Stash, which offers a super simple mobile investing app and has roughly 2.5mm users, did some analysis on male and female users to see if there was a material difference in risk tolerance between men and women on their service. The conventional wisdom is that men are risk takers and women are more conservative. Stash found that there really isn’t much difference between male and female users of their service when it comes to risk tolerance. And they found that women are more tolerant of the highs and lows that come with being an investor. Check out the data here. https://avc.com/2018/09/investment-risk-tolerance-by-gender/

Investment Risk Tolerance By Gender1


Our portfolio company Stash, which offers a super simple mobile investing app and has roughly 2.5mm users, did some analysis on male and female users to see if there was a material difference in risk tolerance between men and women on their service. The conventional wisdom is that men are risk takers and women are more conservative. Stash found that there really isn’t much difference between male and female users of their service when it comes to risk tolerance. And they found that women are more tolerant of the highs and lows that come with being an investor. Check out the data here. https://avc.com/2018/09/investment-risk-tolerance-by-gender/

Nike – Social Justice Warriors


Source: http://themusingsofthebigredcar.com/nike-social-justice-warriors/ So, I have long given up on the National Football League and, of course, it’s college football season, so who needs them? Turns out Nike does and made the fallen angel Colin Kaepernick the centerpiece of their 30th anniversary “Just do it!” advertising campaign. Doesn’t impact me – well, other than I am not buying any Nike stuff, but I’m a long time vintage Adidas guy anyway. So, I got interested in what other social justice things Mighty Nike was involved in and, WOW, did I find out some troubling stuff. Nike, social justice warrior? Well, dear reader, it turns out that our friends at Nike are a little spotty on their social justice bonafides. Here is what I learned from a self-produced report.  1. Nike runs more than 700 factories to produce their shoes and clothing which have a troubling record of alleged abuses. Nike runs factories in China (124), Vietnam (34), Thailand (73), South Korea (35), South America, Australia, Canada, Italy, Mexico, Turkey, and the United States. Quite a wide spread.  2. Worldwide, Nike employs 650,000 workers.  3. Nike made a $1,500,000 payment to settle allegations that it, Nike, had made false claims as to how well its workers were treated.  4. Nike is accused of bad behavior in Asia. Let me define “bad behavior.” Bad behavior means: Physical abuse (found in more than 25% of factories), Verbal abuse (found in more than 25% of factories), Restricted access to toilets (25-50% of factories), Restricted access to water (25-50% of factories), Work week in excess of 60 hours (50% of factories) Limited time off – less than one day off in seven (25-50% of factories), Punishing workers who refused to work overtime (25%), and, Substandard pay rates below legal minimum wage rates. This is the face of Nike. Are these sweatshops? Nike, WTF? The report from which this data comes was commissioned by Nike who did it to attempt to gain control of their supply chain. Bravo. The big question is why the Hell did it get so damn bad in the first place? Nike has joined something called The Fair Labour Association, a good step. Nike, bottom line it, Big Red Car OK, here’s the bottom line: Nike, the company championing the social justice concerns of millionaire Colin Kaepernick and the NFL Illuminati is allegedly running sweat shops in Asia. That’s who is doing the virtue signaling and pontificating. Bunch of damn phonies. Screw Nike – or words to that effect. Now, let’s give them a bit of credit for admitting some of it. But, hey, what the Hell do I really know? I’m just a Big Red Car. Be good to yourself and wear your New Balance shoes to the gym. See you there. Share this:EmailTweetShare on TumblrPrint Related Source: http://themusingsofthebigredcar.com/nike-social-justice-warriors/

Nobody cares


           Comics: Random Popular Latest Cat Comics Comics: Random Popular Latest Cat Comics Home Comics Blog Quizzes About Contact All artwork and content on this site is Copyright © 2018 Matthew Inman. Please don't steal. var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-9487849-1"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} Source: http://theoatmeal.com/comics/nobody_cares

Retaining vs Deleting Emails1


Conventional wisdom is that deleting old emails regularly is the best way to avoid issues down the road. My experience has been different. I’ve been involved in a few legal matters over the years where email discovery has been done. Going back and re-reading emails you sent years ago is a pretty enlightening experience. What I have found is if you have the right intentions and act reasonably and responsibly, old emails often show that to everyone and can be valuable. Being able to go back over old emails is also a great way to jog a foggy memory. So while I understand the challenges with having a lot of written and discoverable emails “on file”, I would argue they they often can be quite valuable. https://avc.com/2018/09/retaining-vs-deleting-emails/