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Funding Friday: The L-Ternative Bridge1


Every day 300,000 people take the L train to and from work. I am not sure if that is 300,000 people or 150,000 people going in and out, but either way, it’s a lot of people. And the MTA is going to shut down the L train for 15 months, starting in April 2019. So this is a big deal for NYC, and a big deal for NYC tech companies. In an informal and unscientific poll I took this week of NYC tech company CEOs, about 20-25% of the employees of NYC tech companies in Manhattan take the L train to work. So how are these people going to commute for those 15 months (which is almost certainly going to take longer than 15 months)? The best answer I have heard from the NYC government is “more buses going over the Williamsburg bridge.” Which is an option but not a fantastic option. The Williamsburg bridge is already a crowded transportation mode during the morning and evening rush hours and more buses means something is going to have to give. So this week, I saw this cool project pop up on Kickstarter. Take just one minute and watch this video: Pretty cool, right? My dad was an Army Corp of Engineers officer his entire career and retired a Brigadier General. He knows a lot about pontoon bridges. So I asked him if this idea is viable. He said: Fred, Having built several pontoon bridges, including some designed for 60-ton tanks, I know the idea is feasible. (One of my bridges was across the Rhine River.  That was done for the first time by Julius Caesar.) Drawbacks:  they are expensive, have low speed limits, and require constant maintenance. Still, if the permanent solution in that location can’t handle traffic for some time, this could be a temporary replacement. Interesting idea. Thanks for sharing it with me. Love, Dad That’s all I need to know that this will work. My dad knows his stuff when it comes to pontoon bridges. So if you want to see this idea get some traction, go to Kickstarter and support this project like I did this week. http://avc.com/2018/02/funding-friday-the-l-ternative-bridge/

Funding Friday: The L-Ternative Bridge1


Every day 300,000 people take the L train to and from work. I am not sure if that is 300,000 people or 150,000 people going in and out, but either way, it’s a lot of people. And the MTA is going to shut down the L train for 15 months, starting in April 2019. So this is a big deal for NYC, and a big deal for NYC tech companies. In an informal and unscientific poll I took this week of NYC tech company CEOs, about 20-25% of the employees of NYC tech companies in Manhattan take the L train to work. So how are these people going to commute for those 15 months (which is almost certainly going to take longer than 15 months)? The best answer I have heard from the NYC government is “more buses going over the Williamsburg bridge.” Which is an option but not a fantastic option. The Williamsburg bridge is already a crowded transportation mode during the morning and evening rush hours and more buses means something is going to have to give. So this week, I saw this cool project pop up on Kickstarter. Take just one minute and watch this video: Pretty cool, right? My dad was an Army Corp of Engineers officer his entire career and retired a Brigadier General. He knows a lot about pontoon bridges. So I asked him if this idea is viable. He said: Fred, Having built several pontoon bridges, including some designed for 60-ton tanks, I know the idea is feasible. (One of my bridges was across the Rhine River.  That was done for the first time by Julius Caesar.) Drawbacks:  they are expensive, have low speed limits, and require constant maintenance. Still, if the permanent solution in that location can’t handle traffic for some time, this could be a temporary replacement. Interesting idea. Thanks for sharing it with me. Love, Dad That’s all I need to know that this will work. My dad knows his stuff when it comes to pontoon bridges. So if you want to see this idea get some traction, go to Kickstarter and support this project like I did this week. http://avc.com/2018/02/funding-friday-the-l-ternative-bridge/

Funding Friday: The L-Ternative Bridge1


Every day 300,000 people take the L train to and from work. I am not sure if that is 300,000 people or 150,000 people going in and out, but either way, it’s a lot of people. And the MTA is going to shut down the L train for 15 months, starting in April 2019. So this is a big deal for NYC, and a big deal for NYC tech companies. In an informal and unscientific poll I took this week of NYC tech company CEOs, about 20-25% of the employees of NYC tech companies in Manhattan take the L train to work. So how are these people going to commute for those 15 months (which is almost certainly going to take longer than 15 months)? The best answer I have heard from the NYC government is “more buses going over the Williamsburg bridge.” Which is an option but not a fantastic option. The Williamsburg bridge is already a crowded transportation mode during the morning and evening rush hours and more buses means something is going to have to give. So this week, I saw this cool project pop up on Kickstarter. Take just one minute and watch this video: Pretty cool, right? My dad was an Army Corp of Engineers officer his entire career and retired a Brigadier General. He knows a lot about pontoon bridges. So I asked him if this idea is viable. He said: Fred, Having built several pontoon bridges, including some designed for 60-ton tanks, I know the idea is feasible. (One of my bridges was across the Rhine River.  That was done for the first time by Julius Caesar.) Drawbacks:  they are expensive, have low speed limits, and require constant maintenance. Still, if the permanent solution in that location can’t handle traffic for some time, this could be a temporary replacement. Interesting idea. Thanks for sharing it with me. Love, Dad That’s all I need to know that this will work. My dad knows his stuff when it comes to pontoon bridges. So if you want to see this idea get some traction, go to Kickstarter and support this project like I did this week. http://avc.com/2018/02/funding-friday-the-l-ternative-bridge/

Funding Friday: The L-Ternative Bridge1


Every day 300,000 people take the L train to and from work. I am not sure if that is 300,000 people or 150,000 people going in and out, but either way, it’s a lot of people. And the MTA is going to shut down the L train for 15 months, starting in April 2019. So this is a big deal for NYC, and a big deal for NYC tech companies. In an informal and unscientific poll I took this week of NYC tech company CEOs, about 20-25% of the employees of NYC tech companies in Manhattan take the L train to work. So how are these people going to commute for those 15 months (which is almost certainly going to take longer than 15 months)? The best answer I have heard from the NYC government is “more buses going over the Williamsburg bridge.” Which is an option but not a fantastic option. The Williamsburg bridge is already a crowded transportation mode during the morning and evening rush hours and more buses means something is going to have to give. So this week, I saw this cool project pop up on Kickstarter. Take just one minute and watch this video: Pretty cool, right? My dad was an Army Corp of Engineers officer his entire career and retired a Brigadier General. He knows a lot about pontoon bridges. So I asked him if this idea is viable. He said: Fred, Having built several pontoon bridges, including some designed for 60-ton tanks, I know the idea is feasible. (One of my bridges was across the Rhine River.  That was done for the first time by Julius Caesar.) Drawbacks:  they are expensive, have low speed limits, and require constant maintenance. Still, if the permanent solution in that location can’t handle traffic for some time, this could be a temporary replacement. Interesting idea. Thanks for sharing it with me. Love, Dad That’s all I need to know that this will work. My dad knows his stuff when it comes to pontoon bridges. So if you want to see this idea get some traction, go to Kickstarter and support this project like I did this week. http://avc.com/2018/02/funding-friday-the-l-ternative-bridge/

Funding Friday: The L-Ternative Bridge1


Every day 300,000 people take the L train to and from work. I am not sure if that is 300,000 people or 150,000 people going in and out, but either way, it’s a lot of people. And the MTA is going to shut down the L train for 15 months, starting in April 2019. So this is a big deal for NYC, and a big deal for NYC tech companies. In an informal and unscientific poll I took this week of NYC tech company CEOs, about 20-25% of the employees of NYC tech companies in Manhattan take the L train to work. So how are these people going to commute for those 15 months (which is almost certainly going to take longer than 15 months)? The best answer I have heard from the NYC government is “more buses going over the Williamsburg bridge.” Which is an option but not a fantastic option. The Williamsburg bridge is already a crowded transportation mode during the morning and evening rush hours and more buses means something is going to have to give. So this week, I saw this cool project pop up on Kickstarter. Take just one minute and watch this video: Pretty cool, right? My dad was an Army Corp of Engineers officer his entire career and retired a Brigadier General. He knows a lot about pontoon bridges. So I asked him if this idea is viable. He said: Fred, Having built several pontoon bridges, including some designed for 60-ton tanks, I know the idea is feasible. (One of my bridges was across the Rhine River.  That was done for the first time by Julius Caesar.) Drawbacks:  they are expensive, have low speed limits, and require constant maintenance. Still, if the permanent solution in that location can’t handle traffic for some time, this could be a temporary replacement. Interesting idea. Thanks for sharing it with me. Love, Dad That’s all I need to know that this will work. My dad knows his stuff when it comes to pontoon bridges. So if you want to see this idea get some traction, go to Kickstarter and support this project like I did this week. http://avc.com/2018/02/funding-friday-the-l-ternative-bridge/