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Video Of The Week: Blockchains: A Shift (Back)Toward Decentralization1


Last week I posted a video that the folks at Upfront Ventures did on the current investor mindset in crypto. There are few more videos in this Upfront series and today I am posting one about the shift towards decentralization that the blockchain represents. http://avc.com/2018/02/video-of-the-week-blockchains-a-shift-backtoward-decentralization/

Cyber Monday 201773


The Oatmeal Cyber Monday Sale Use discount code CYBER25 and get 25% off your entire order Exploding Kittens - Party Pack Edition A new expanded version that supports up to ten players. It also plays party music, in case that's your thing. This product is not available on Amazon! Normally $30.00 HOLIDAY PRICE: $22.50 View Party Pack Source: http://theoatmeal.com/blog/black_friday2017

Setting days up to maximize Problem Solving versus Insights


Dan Pink’s new book “When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing” has some fascinating insights on how we can set our days up for problem solving versus insights. First up, let’s consider 2 puzzles. The Linda Problem – a test of problem solving Linda is 31 years old, single, outspoken, and very bright. She majored in philosophy. As a student, she was deeply concerned with issues of discrimination and social justice, and also participated in anti-nuclear demonstrations. Which is more probable? Linda is a bank teller. Linda is a bank teller and is active in the feminist movement. The Ernesto coin problem – a test of insight Ernesto is a dealer in antique coins. One day, someone brings a beautiful bronze coin. The coin has an emperor’s head on one side and the date 544 BC stamped on the other. Ernesto examines it – but instead of buying it, he calls the police. Why? The Linda problem is a test of logic and requires vigilance. The common mistake that people make is to say that the description makes it more likely that Linda is both a bank teller and active in the feminist movement. But, of course, it is more likely that Linda is a bank teller as the second option is a subset of the first. The Ernesto coin problem is one of those where you have to let the insight hit you. Once you notice let the fact that the date of 544 BC could not have been legitimate (how did they know Christ would be born 544 years laterthe problem is solved. Solving insight problems actually requires less vigilance. Researchers who’ve tested people on their ability to solve Linda and Ernesto problems have uncovered some fascinating insights on timing- The morning is best for tests of vigilance – problem solving and detail work. The late afternoon is best for solving insight problems as we let insights come to us during a period of less vigilance. Why? Researchers found that, for 75% of us, our energy over the course of the day, regardless of where we are from, spikes in the morning, goes down in the afternoon and rebounds in the evening. For the 25% of us who are “owls” by nature, the highest spike happens in the evening. So, the pattern of solving Linda problems versus Ernesto problems was reversed for owls versus larks and everyone in between. An interesting note – high school and college years tend to convert more folks into owls (this happened to me). And, men tend to be more likely to be owls than women. We all know that timing plays a big role in our external success. But, few realize how important timing is to our day-to-day productivity. It is important we understand it and design for it. Share this: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Like this: Like Loading... Related https://alearningaday.com/2018/01/26/setting-days-up-to-maximize-problem-solving-versus-insights/

LL Bean _#8212; When People Ruin Things


Source: http://themusingsofthebigredcar.com/ll-bean-people-ruing-things/ Big Red Car here after a trip to Savannah to worship the new My Perfect Granddaughter. Today, we speak of LL Bean, but first a picture: Big Red Car, sheesh, leave me alone. I’m sleeping. So, today, dear reader, we speak of how people can ruin things, specifically, the former unconditional satisfaction guarantee from LL Bean. LL Bean and The Boss LL Bean is a company near and dear to The Boss. Once upon a time, when he was a young, combat engineer lieutenant traipsing about the hills in South Korea, nigh to the border with North Korea along the Demiltarized Zone (an area which is totally militarized), he wrote to LL Bean inquiring as to their recommendation for a good pair of socks and boots to forestall the cold and  moisture. [Typed the letter on a manual typewriter in a freezing cold tent dug into the side of a hill overlooking the Imjin River whereat there was a great sufficiency of cold and moisture as they were only a hundred miles from Manchuria.] LL Bean replied by return post — takes a long time to get a package from Maine in  the US to Korea in Asia — with a pair of hunting boots and a full box of socks. FREE. Did I mention they were FREE? The Boss mentioned he had about 50 men in his unit and the Beansters sent 144 pairs of socks. Each man got two pairs of socks. You used to carry the second pair of socks in your armpit to keep them from freezing. Hello, America! The Boss has always loved LL Bean. The LL Bean Unconditional Satisfaction Guarantee Part of the LL Bean magic has been an unconditional satisfaction guarantee — has been for more than a century. Now, the company will limit the guarantee to a single year. Why, Big Red Car? The reason is simple, dear reader, abuse. LL Bean, founded by Leon Leonwood Bean in Maine 106 years ago, reports the following abuses:  1. People were returning  merchandise which has consumed its useful life. This violates the spirit of the deal. It was intended to guarantee satisfaction with the product, not a free replacement policy.  2. People were buying merchandise at yard sales and returning it to LL Bean for new replacement merchandise — also, not the deal. Big point — the LL Bean guarantee allowed a buyer to receive either CASH or a replacement product. The yard sale people were turning this into a cottage industry. In the last five years, this has cost the company $250,000,000 — WOW! New, tighter policy Now, the LL Bean policy is as follows:  1. You may return merchandise for any reason within one year of purchase with a “proof of purchase.” LL Bean has exquisite records, so getting a proof of purchase is no high hurdle. No yard sale baloney.  2. You may return defective merchandise forever. They will give you good merchandise. Read about it here: The New LL Bean Guarantee. Shipping LL Bean has always provided free shipping. Now, the free shipping requires an order of a minimum of $50. Not quite the worst policy ever. Fair, it seems. So, dear reader, there you have it. Crooked persons ruin another great retail policy with their avarice and greed. But, hey, what the Hell do I really know anyway? I’m just a Big Red Car, but I’m heading to Colorado to ski, so I may need a good pair of flannel lined LL Bean jeans, huh? Have a great weekend. Next week is Valentine’s Day.           Source: http://themusingsofthebigredcar.com/ll-bean-people-ruing-things/

Multiplicative Idiocy32


Want to print this out and hang it up? Download the free PDF. Further reading (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.5&appId=122125307879498"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk')); The Oatmeal Share this   Latest Things Random Comics Browse more comics >> Home Comics Blog Quizzes About Contact All artwork and content on this site is Copyright © 2016 Matthew Inman. Please don't steal. var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-9487849-1"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} Source: http://theoatmeal.com/comics/idiocy